All About Data Recovery Plan

The disaster recovery plan should describe how your business will cope in the case of an emergency, what actions will be undertaken and who will co-ordinate them. But what things should go into a plan? In our checklist below we describe some of the things to consider.

Disaster Recovery Checklist.
1. Analyze your business
What systems can be down for what period before serious consequences occurs? For example, if your ERP system goes down and you can't process sales what the impact is? With a subjective view, you'll probably find that you can manage without some systems for a while (perhaps up to a week) with other's you'll need them back up again as soon as possible. Develop some computer failure procedures to manage your key business activity when IT is unavailable - make sure that copies of these processes are included in the plan. Disaster Recovery

2. Identify possible risks
Examples of risks to your business include the loss of IT systems, loss of buildings or plant/machinery, etc. Detail some mitigation in your recovery plan. For example, if you don't have access to your office in the event of a disaster is there other business premises/temporary accommodation that you can use? If so list appropriate telephone numbers as part of the plan.

3. Recovery team
Put together a recovery team with clear lines of authorization who are responsible for coordinating activity in case of disaster. They should be responsible for maintaining your disaster recovery plan and meet on a regular basis to ensure that the plan is still relevant and accurate.  IT Consultants

4. Backup your IT systems
Ensure that you backup your IT systems at suitably regular intervals (and test the recovery process!!!) Make sure that any backup tapes/CD's are stored off site or in a fire proof safe. Make sure the recovery process is documented in your Disaster recovery plan. Data Backup Services

5. Inventory your key equipment
Keep an inventory of crucial capital equipment and machinery so that it's easily identified and replaceable if needs arise. Keep a record of suitable suppliers and contact numbers so that you can use them in an emergency.

6. Identify any external risks
For example, if a business partner (perhaps a key supplier?) suffers a disaster what is the impact on your business and how would you mitigate it? Expert Data Backup Support

7. Don't forget the paper
Too many businesses focus their disaster recovery plans purely on IT - don't forget the impact a loss of paper records may have. How would you manage if all your paper documents are destroyed? IT Maintenance

Disaster Recovery

A computer disaster recovery plan usually involves a study of existing hardware and setting up of a data backup plan. The data backup plan ensures data is constantly or regularly backed up onto remote locations. The data is transmitted and retained in an encrypted form to prevent theft.

Any business that has critical data stored in computers and makes use of computers in their daily work needs to have a computer disaster recovery plan.

Just as shelters are built before disaster strikes so too is a computer disaster recovery plan created and tested. Should a disaster strike in which all or some of the hardware or software is damaged, the computer disaster recovery plan ensures that the business network is up and running in the least possible time frame and with zero or near zero data loss.

Wondering whether you need a computer disaster recovery plan is like wondering whether you need insurance. Disasters strike anytime and anywhere.

Most offices today tend to rely less on paper and more on digital and top information technology consulting services to organize, process, store and transmit information. It is incredibly faster and cheaper than paper and cardboard files. The only problem is when a disaster strikes. The ruined hardware could greatly affect your business. All invoices, client lists, client information, and scanned copies of agreements could be lost. Disaster Recovery Management

The hardware can be replaced but re-starting your business without the accumulated data would be a slow and excruciatingly difficult process - one which is guaranteed to cost you customer loyalty, lost business and a very injured bottom-line.

When locating a computer disaster recovery planning and service provider in your area, make sure they are not only able to set up a data backup system but that they are able to stress test the management system by actually simulating a disaster. Ultimately you have to be convinced that should a disaster occur in which all hardware and data is lost, the service provider can set up your IT hardware in a short amount of time. Disaster Recovery Services

 

What Is Disaster Recovery and How Does It Affect Modern Business

At times when production was reliant on physical means, such as machinery, plants, paperwork, etc., these were the assets a company's management had to worry about when a mishap, like equipment failure or natural disasters, occurred. However, as data has become the sole central element to today's economy, data flow is the thing to worry about lest disaster hits. According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), the world contained 4.4 Zettabytes (ZB), or 4.4 billion TB, of data in 2013, a number that was forecasted to increase almost tenfold by the year 2020. Disaster Recovery

Over and above that, the modern business environment has developed in a way where businesses in most industries are obliged to make themselves available around the clock if they are to stand any chance in today's fierce competition. This makes the breakdown of a company's system no matter how briefly, not merely harmful, but rather catastrophic, for its business operation.

IDC estimated the cost of downtime (the time when a company's machines, particularly the computers, are not running) averages at around $100,000 per hour, and that number is merely 1/16 from what the maximum hourly cost could reach for the largest organizations ($1.6 million). As a matter of fact, without the occurrence of any big events, companies experience somewhere between 10 to 20 hours of downtime per year, so one can only imagine what the impact of a natural disaster or a major cyber-attack could be like for business operations. 

From here emerged the need for the concept of Disaster Recovery (DR), which is basically a strategy that a company puts to work in order to ensure the immediate resumption of what are called in business terms, "mission-critical functions," following a major disaster. Network Services

Disaster recovery strategies are designed to anticipate the potential hazard of such events on the company's IT infrastructure, and accordingly, a plan is set to recover as much data as possible following the disaster, by creating constant backups of any data flowing through the company's system throughout daily operations, the frequency of which is determined by the recovery point objective (RPO), which is part of the DR plan. This data is often stored in a physical site separate from the company's location. The other core element of the DR plan is the recovery time objective (RTO), which determines how much downtime can pass before the system starts to recover its data from the backup site. MSP Services

 

Effective Disaster Recovery for Small Businesses

One might think that all is safe and well in today's advanced electronic technology for any business, small or big. But that is far from the truth; disaster can happen in any sized business, but in a small business, a disaster spells catastrophe if no preventive measures or disaster recovery plans were developed before the disaster. Disaster Recovery It is crucial for a small business to consider a disaster recovery plan just in case its business is disrupted for some reason or other. A disaster recovery for small businesses involves the development of a business continuity plan that can be set in motion when disaster befalls the small business. If no such recovery or continuity plan is available, a small business may easily fold up as it does not have sufficient resources to recover since it was unprepared for the disaster. Hipaa Compliance

A business continuity plan is a smart investment on a process to safeguard a huge or total loss when disaster befalls it. It is a plan that contains the resumption of business through defined procedures when disaster strikes. It allows the company to recover more quickly and resume its business with minimal losses or disruption and hence, retain its good reputation and image.Back Ups during Disaster RecoveryIn this high-tech era where even small businesses are not spared from advanced technologies, an electronic disaster can very well happen as in a power failure. If a small business did not perform the necessary file backups on its important documents frequently, it stands to lose all its important information and hence, halts its business operations and revenue. Files containing important business information should be backed up regularly using the three-generation process - "Grandfather, father and son" principle. Hence, you will get three sets of file backups that you can use during a disaster that wipes out your current data. It takes diligence to perform the 3 generation file backups as you need to record carefully the backup level carefully.Image-based backup is an alternative backup of your important information by the disk.  msp Services

Every sector is copied and stored as a virtual drive which can be easily restored through a bare-metal restoration.Off-site StorageWhen you have your backups performed regularly, it is advisable to store them off-site; this is to prevent their loss from thefts, fire or accidental deletion. When your small business experience a disaster that wipes out your important business data, you can easily restore your system files with a simple call to the disaster recovery center that holds your backups. These can be couriered over or electronically transferred quickly when power is restored to your computer system.If you have signed up for a disaster recovery plan, your contract will set the professional recovery team in motion to assist you in recovering from the disaster quickly, restoring your systems and processes.
ROI in image-based backupTime is money; the longer your small business recovery from a disaster, the more loss you will incur. Hence, the appropriate backup will indicate your possible loss during a disaster recovery. With small businesses, there may not be too much data to be backed up; hence, an image based backup may be more suitable for small business recoveries.It allows a faster recovery of your systems which in turn leads to smaller losses; hence, image-based backup offers a higher return on investment for small businesses disaster recovery. Network Services